Tag: english

In print: #10 of Daily Resistance!

Yesterday morning, 1 October, the 10th issue of “Daily Resistance” was sent to our printer! It’s a special #OplatzTurns10 issue and bigger than usual, devoted to the Refugee Movement from O-Platz/Ohlauer and all movements around the world. Get your copies by writing a mail to dailyresistance(at)systemli(dot)org – and spread them afterwards, so many people can read it!

The issue consists of several multi-lingual articles, but especially focuses on two larger interviews by the editorial team of ‘Daily Resistance’. Firstly, we spoke about the 10th anniversary of the O-Platz occupation with activists* who were part of the protest camp and Ohlauer school and who reflect on the time, its forthcomings, their current and future activism. Since it’s also the 10th issue (the first one was delivered in March 2016) of ‘Daily Resistance’, we brought together old and new comrades who shaped the newspaper and talked about the beginnings, the importance of own media for the Refugee Movement, collaborations, and plans.

Next to that, there will be multilingual articles and interviews on ongoing wars and conflicts in Ukraine and Iran, reflections about perpetuating colonial injustice by The Voice Refugee Forum, a speech by International Women* Space held at the 30 years commemoration demo of the nazi attacks in Rostock-Lichtenhagen – and two more personal stances on the importance of critical self-reflection in anti-racist activism from 2012 till today. Many photos from several photographers in solidarity from Umbruch Bildarchiv contributed to the issue, as well – thank you!

Let’s continue the fight, let’s struggle together!

Yours,

Daily Resistance

10 years of the protest camp at Oranienplatz … No reason to celebrate


I don’t want our history to be falsified: When you commemorate the protest camp on Oranienplatz, which started in October 2012, remember correctly!


Remember Mohammad Rahsepar! At the end of January 2012, Mohammad Rahsepar took his own life at a refugee camp in Würzburg. He had already expressed suicidal thoughts in December. Therefore, doctors had recommended to the responsible authorities to improve his accommodation situation. He wanted to join his sister in Cologne, but the authorities refused this because of “Residenzpflicht” – obligation of a residencefor asylum seekers. His death triggered a wave of protests throughout Germany.

His friends and housemates set up a protest camp on the street to draw attention to their situation: Camp accommodation, the voucher system, Residenzpflicht, the ban on employment and constant uncertainty. Their protest quickly spread to many cities all over Germany. Here in Berlin there was also a protest tent on Heinrichplatz.

Remember the ‘Residenzpflicht’! The ‘Residenzpflicht’ does not exist in any other European country. Its origins go back to the colonial times. The National Socialists made residence obligation in a law for forced labourers in their police regulation of 1938. In 1982, the legislators revived the regulation again and integrated it in the ‘Asylverfahrensgesetz’ (Asylum Procedure Act) for asylum seekers. Until the end of 2014, all asylum seekers had to get a permission from the immigration authorities every time they wanted to leave their district. Sometimes they got permission, most of the time they did not.

At the end of the 90s, the authorities used the residence obligation to prevent asylum seekers from engaging in political activities. For every demonstration, every congress or meeting, we had to find a way to deal with controls. At the end of 2014, the residence obligation was relaxed for some of the asylum seekers. After the first three months in Germany, it is now allowed to travel in the whole Germany without a specific permit. At least in theory. Because there are numerous reasons for exclusion from this supposed “freedom of movement”. Refugees with ‘Duldung’, in particular, remain subject to arbitrariness of the authorities. The immigration authorities can chain them to the district at any time.

By the way, the first demonstration against Residenzpflicht was in 2000, organised by the ‚Karawane für die Rechte von Flüchtlingen und Migrantinnen‘ (Caravan for the Rights of Refugees and Migrants). Since then, many refugee self-organisations, for example the Voice Refugee Forum or the ‘Flüchtlingsinitiative Brandenburg‘ (Refugee Initiative Brandenburg), have fought against the Residenzpflicht. Those who talk about the protest camp at Oranienplatz without mentioning the other protest actions of refugees in 2012 and the past of our struggles are not showing solidarity but are rather ignoring us.

Remember the Refugee Protest March! In September 2012, a group of refugees started the REFUGEE PROTEST MARCH from Würzburg to Berlin. They protested against the ‘Residenzpflicht’ and took their protest to the political leaders in Berlin. On October 5th 2012 – after one month and 600 km of walking they reached their destination. A group of activists in Berlin supported the protest march by organising a camp at Oranienplatz as a place for arrival. The camp was planned for some weeks in order to organize a big final demonstration and to plan further actions. None of us planned a protest camp that would last over a year.

Remember correctly! Oranienplatz was never occupied. Again and again there were negotiations with the district mayors that led to the Oranienplatz remaining tolerated. Those who claim that Oranienplatz was occupied are ignoring our work, the work of the activists who prepared the camp and who negotiated for years.

Many people from all over Germany came to the demonstration at the end of the protest march on October 13th 2012. It got really big. After that, there were different approaches to further actions: While one group started a hunger strike on Pariser Platz, others stayed on Oranienplatz and used it as a starting point for different actions.

In the winter of 2012, refugees from Italy joined. For them the protest camp was primarily a place of survival. They fled homelessness, hunger and a lack of prospects in Italy to Berlin. That is how Oranienplatz became a symbol for the inhumanity and cruelty of the German and the EU asylum policy. Unfortunately, we have only managed to link the different groups and interests of the refugees at Oranienplatz in single actions. The asylum system has divided us. And there were also power struggles and divisions among the supporters.

Remember correctly! Oranienplatz was not evicted by the police. It was refugees who cleared the tents of other refugees. The Senate – also with the help of so-called supporters – managed to divide the refugees at Oranienplatz.

Let’s learn from the old mistakes instead of repeating them. Governments and parliaments are dividing us with their racist migration policies. We have to oppose this and grow even closer together.

And finally: Remember that until today some refugees who were at Oranienplatz back then still don’t have residence permits! As long as that is the case, there is no reason for me to celebrate.

Bruno Watara, July 2022

taken from the upcoming issue #10 of Daily Resistance

RIGHT TO STAY for ALL instead of opportunity trap!

Info event: 04 October 2022 | 6 pm | 2. HH – MehringHof – Gneisenaustr. 2a – 10961 Berlin
On the podium:

Berenice Böhlo (Migration law Lawyer)
Bruno Watara (activist, R.w.A.)
Asylum counsellor, KuB: requested

Rally: Fr, 7 October 2022 | 4pm | Bundestag

The federal government aims to implement its migration and refugee policy promises in the coalition agreement of the SPD, A BÜNDNIS 90/DIE GRÜNEN and the FDP in a total of four legislative packages by the end of 2023. On 6 July 2022, the cabinet adopted the first of these so-called migration packages. They promise to stand for an improved migration and refugee policy, using terms that sound good such as “opportunities”, “participation” or “respect”. However, these buzzwords do not correspond at all to the real situation and are also not provided for in practice in the planned migration laws. The coalition is further sticking to the previous principles of migration and refugee policy that are characterised by “security concerns”, “burden on the social system”, criminalisation, isolation, racist discrimination, disenfranchisement, dozens of hurdles for the granting of residence rights, readiness to take in refugees  only if there is political and economic benefit, etc.

We think opportunities, participation and respect look different. That is why we demand from the legislators a right to stay for all instead of an opportunity trap!

At the information event, we would like to take a closer look at the trickily formulated draft laws. We would like to get a better overview of the practical effects of the planned changes for migrants and refugees in Germany and present our campaign. 

We hope for a broad, supra-regional cooperation with refugee organisations and supporters!

• The event is in German. Whispered translation into English, French and Turkish will be provided on site. We will also try to offer other languages.

• In view of the increasing numbers of covid-19, we would like all participants to wear a medical or FFP2 mask on site.

On 07 October 2022 at 16:00 we also want to protest together against the migration packages in front of the Bundestag to send a strong signal for real opportunities!

Campaign network „RIGHT TO STAY for ALL instead of opportunity trap“:

Allmende e.V., Bantabaa e.V., Barnim für Alle, Berliner Gruppe Sea-Eye e.V. , BumF – Bundesfachverband unbegleitete minderjährige Flüchtlinge e.V., Ende Gelände Berlin, Flüchtlingsrat Brandenburg, Frauenkreise Berlin, Jugendliche ohne Grenzen, Kontakt- und Beratungsstelle für Flüchtlinge und Migrant_innen e.V., Migrationsrat Berlin, No Border Assembly, Refugees with Attitudes – R.w.A, We’ll Come United Berlin-Brandenburg.


More info:

www: https://bleiberecht-statt-chancenfalle.net/

Twitter: @Alle_Bleiben

Instagram: bleiberecht-statt-chancenfalle

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BleibeRecht

O-Platz wird 10 – Baustelle Migration (5.10. – 9.10.22)

Vor 10 Jahren wurde der Kreuzberger Oranienplatz und später dann auch die Gerhart-Hauptmann-
Schule in der Ohlauer Straße besetzt. Anlässlich dieses Jubiläums wollen wir uns vom 5.10. – 9.10. auf dem Oranienplatz versammeln und die Geschichte der rebellischen Geflüchteten-Bewegung feiern.


Mit einer fünftägigen Open-Air-Kunstbaustelle zeigen wir die Geschichte des Refugee-Resistance-
Movements und die zahlreichen Facetten der Kämpfe, die auf und um den O-Platz geführt wurden. Menschen, die damals wie heute in der Bewegung aktiv sind und auf dem O-Platz präsent waren, werden ein Festivalprogramm mit Theater, Grafik, Malerei, Literatur, Fotografie und Film gestalten, in dem wir auf vielfältige künstlerische Weise die Stationen des Widerstands nachzeichnen: vom langen Marsch nach Berlin bis hin zur schändlichen Räumung des Camps durch den Berliner Senat
und den Bezirk.


Zehn Jahre nach dem Beginn der Besetzung des O-Platzes wollen wir aber nicht nur unsere Geschichte feiern, sondern auch einen Vorschlag für eine Gesellschaft unterbreiten, die sich als vielfältig, postkolonial, basisdemokratisch und postmigrantisch versteht.

Unser Widerstand lebt. O-Platz lebt.


O-Platz turns 10 – Migration construction site (05.10.-09.10.22)

10 years ago the Oranienplatz in Kreuzberg and later also the Gerhart Hauptmann School in Ohlauer Straße were occupied. To mark this anniversary, we want to gather at Oranienplatz from 5/10 – 9/10 and celebrate the history of the rebellious refugee movement.


With a five-day open-air art “construction site”, we will show the history of the Refugee Resistance
Movement and the many facets of the struggles on and around O-Platz. People who were active in the movement then and now and were present on O-Platz are creating a programme with theatre, graphics, painting, literature, photography and film, in which we trace the stages of the resistance in a variety of artistic ways: From the long march to Berlin to the shameful eviction of the camp by the Berlin Senate and the district.


Ten years after the beginning of the occupation of O-Platz, however, we not only want to celebrate our history, but also make a proposal for a society that sees itself as diverse, postcolonial, grassroots democratic and postmigrant.


Our resistance is alive. O-Platz is alive.

Daily Resistance Assembly #3, November 24

DAILY RESISTANCE ASSEMBLY
24 November 2021 – from 7 pm
at Café Karanfil (Weisestr. 3, Neukölln/U-Bahn Boddinstr.)

With the third assembly we invite you to join and contribute to the newspaper Daily Resistance. At the Assembly we will introduce the work of the newspaper: How are we organised? What are our tasks? Who do we want to reach with the newspaper? Support the work of Daily Resistance! Come to the Assembly! We look forward to seeing you!

///

DAILY RESISTANCE ASSEMBLY
24. November 2021 – ab 19 Uhr
im Café Karanfil (Weisestr. 3, Neukölln/U-Bahn Boddinstr.)

Mit der dritten Assembly laden wir euch zur aktiven Mitarbeit an der Zeitung Daily Resistance ein. Auf der Assembly werden wir die Arbeit der Zeitung vorstellen: Wie sind wir organisiert? Welche Aufgaben gibt es? Wen wollen wir mit der Zeitung erreichen? Unterstützt die Arbeit der Zeitung! Kommt zur Assembly! Wir freuen uns auf euch!

///

DAILY RESISTANCE BULUŞMASI
24. Kasım 2021 – 19.00’dan itibaren
Café Karanfil’de (Weisestr. 3, Neukölln/U-Bahn Boddinstr.)

Üçncü buluşma ile sizi Daily Resistance gazetesine katılmaya ve katkıda bulunmaya davet ediyoruz. Buluşmada gazetenin çalışmalarını anlatmaya çalışacağız: Nasıl örgütleniyoruz? Gazete içinde hangi işleri yapıyoruz? Gazete ile kimlere ulaşmak istiyoruz? Buluşmaya gelin ve Daily Resistance’in çalışmalarını destekleyin!

Waiting sentence

Uncertainty is an emotion that amplifies during a pandemic. This is a written text on my experience with the asylum process in Germany. Living in exile and reminiscent of memories. A deteriorating sense of self that the waiting game produces.

I have been in my asylum process for 24 months, that is still ongoing. I had the police come into my home, twice to detain and deport me while I was under a Dublin deportation order. I was not at home. For 6 months, I had no legal documents and had to seek protection from the church. I had no health insurance, no access to the job market. I was in constant distress and walking outside became intolerable with fear. I began to isolate myself from my friends and retreated indoors, the only place where I felt safe. I told myself, it was only 6 months. After 6 months, I would be able to live a life where I have rights, as opposed to them taken away.

Six months pass by and Germany handles my asylum case. I receive a temporary residency permit valid for a year while the case is still in process. The fear that I thought I had left behind, only reinforced a foundation of despair. Moving to a country where you have to learn the language from scratch. Leaving your family behind and not knowing when you would be able to meet again. Having to deal with authorities that constrict your movement and rights. Finding safe housing in a city. Not knowing when the police will show up—again—at your place to detain you while you’re still in your asylum process. Living in a constant state of terror that starts to erode any sense of safety.

On August 4th 2020, an explosion took place in Beirut, Lebanon, that was caused by 2,750 tonnes of cargo containing ammonium nitrate that was stored in the capital of Beirut’s port, for six years. Minutes later, I tried to get into contact with my family back home. The phone lines were down and could not reach them. My cousin worked ten minutes away from the port at the time. In an hour of waiting for anyone to respond, the worst possible scenarios were going through my head.

I was thinking that either my family had died from the explosion or were severely injured. Thankfully, my family was safe with minimal injuries. They were lucky. The others, not so much. 207 deaths, 7500 injured. Streets were filled with blood and decapitated bodies as people rushed into the overcrowded hospitals. Doctors were forced to perform surgeries in parking lots as some hospitals were destroyed after the explosion. Nine months later and the Lebanese government has still not taken any action for this negligent massacre on its own people.

There is constant worry at the deteriorating living situation, that my family is experiencing back home. I speak to my family over the phone, and I miss them. When will I ever see them again in person, incessant thoughts come to my mind. Will they be okay, are they okay? How is life over there? They tell me it’s a struggle but that they are luckier than most and are managing. I never know when to believe their answer, their answer stems from wanting me not to worry. They tell me to focus on my life, get through the obstacles and barriers that this country firmly places on a platter. Systematic oppression sprouts hopelessness. This is what asylum seeking does to people. It reduces me to a statistic and collateral damage to be dealt with by PR protocol. I read the latest updates on racist mob attacks around Germany directed at refugees.

We are mocked, spat on and ridiculed for trying to live after losing everything. We are berated and made to feel inferior by authorities. We are unable to find safe housing spaces, are forced to stay in abusive situations and live on the streets. We are unable to find the dignity that we had hoped for before arriving here. Contemplating suicide after two years of living in the same predicament. Waiting in anticipation for a second-third-fourth- decision that predates my future can dissipate.

When I see mental health professionals, I am recommended to focus on my breathing. Superfluous at best. They tell me to change my perspective and outlook in life. How can I do that when we live in a world where systematic oppression exists. How can I focus on my breath when there is a boot crushing my neck? There are injustices surrounding me, that the capability of fighting back becomes vacant over time.

At a certain point, exhaustion grows into a central topic of existence and taking care of basic needs proves to be a struggle. It frightens me to think that I have let this procedure get to me, but how could I not let it get to me? It directly affects my living situation, in all arenas of life. Sometimes, just sometimes, I have the will to go on. To keep on fighting. I am still picking up the pieces as I go along.

Not knowing when this process will be over and what the outcome would be. Would my case receive another rejection in court and return to a country I have no ties to and risk prosecution? Would I be rendered without a residency again?

Why does the German government treat asylum seekers as criminals? Why are people being met with violence at the borders of the EU when carrying out their right to seek asylum as a fundamental human right.

Why are we only accepted to live here if we can prove to be a profitable asset to the economy?

This article has been published by an anonymous person in Daily Resistance #9 in English and Arabic (below)


الرّيبة والخوف من المجهول شعورٌ يتفاقم في أوقات الوباء. ما يلي هو نصّ كتبته عن تجربتي مع عمليّة اللجوء في ألمانيا. يمكنني أن اختصرها بحالةِ تدهورالإحساس بقيمتي الذاتية، نتيجة لعبة الإنتظار

بدأتُ بإجراءت اللجوء منذ 24 شهراً، ولا تزال العملية مستمرّة. أتت الشرطة إلى منزلي مرّتين لإحتجازي وترحيلي بينما كنت بموجب أمر ترحيل من دبلن. لمدّة 6 أشهر لم يكن لدي أي مستندات قانونية و اضطررت الى طلب الحماية من الكنيسة. لم يكن لديّ تأمين صحي ولا إمكانيّة للإنخراط في سوق العمل. وجدت نفسي في قلق مزمن وأصبح تنقّلي خارج المنزل أمرٌ لا يطاق بسب الخوف الدائم. بدأتُ بالانعزال عن اصدقائي و البقاء في المنزل لأنّه المكان الوحيد الذي كنت أشعر فيه بشيء من الأمآن. قلت لفسي بأنّ هذه المعانات ستنتهي بعد 6 أشهر وانني سأتمكن بعدها بالعيش بكامل حقوقي التي سُلبت مني

بعد ستّة أشهر بقيَت قضيّتي في قبضة السّلطات الألمانية. اعطوني تصريح إقامة مؤقّتة لمدّة عام واحد، لكن القضية بقيَت قيد النظر. الخوف الذي اعتقدت أنني سأتخلّص منه عاد، وعزّز فيّ الشعور باليأس. الانتقال إلى بلد جديد، تعلُّم لغة جديدة، ترك عائلتي دون أن أعرف متى سأتمكّن من رؤيتهم مجدّداً، التعامل مع سلطات تقيّد تحرّكاتي وحقوقي، كلّها صعوباتٍ واجهتها. كان الشعور بالخوف وعدم الأمان يلاحقني بإستمرار بينما كنت أحاول أن أجد مكان آمن للسكن. كنت في ترقّب دائم لزيارة مفاجئة من قبل الشرطة لاعتقالي مجدداً بينما كانت اجراءت لجوئي مستمرة.

في الرابع من آب/ أغسطس وقع إنفجار في بيروت/ لبنان نتيجة إشتعال 2750 طنّاً من نترات الأمونيوم المخزّنة في مرفأ العاصمة منذ 6 سنوات. حاولت الإتصال بأسرتي في لبنان ولكن الخطوط كانت معطّلة. كان إبن عمي حينها يعمل بالقرب من المرفأ. خلال ساعة إنتظار ردّاً من عائلتي في لبنان، مرّت في ذهني أسوأ السيناريوهات المحتملة

اعتقدت بأنّ عائلتي قد ماتت في الإنفجار، أو أُصيبت بجروح خطيرة. لحسن الحظ كانت عائلتي بأمآن وأصيبوا بجروح طفيفة. كانوا محظوظين عكس الكثير من الناس الأخرين. 207 قتيل و 7500 جريح كانت الحصيلة. الشوارع امتلأت بالدّماء و الأشلاء، وهرعت الناس إلى المستشفيات المكتظّة. إضطرّ بعد الأطبّاء لإجراء عمليّات جراحيّة في مواقف السيارات، لأن بعض المستشفيات كانت قد دُمّرت في الانفجار. بعد تسعة أشهر على هذه الفاجعة، لم تتخذ الحكومة أي اجراءت ولم تتحمّل مسؤلية هذه المجزرة المتهوّرة بحق شعبها.

لديّ قلق دائم من تدهور الوضع المعيشي الذي تعيشه عائلتي هناك. اتحدث مع عائلتي عبر الهاتف وافتقدهم كثيراً. لا أعلم متى سأرهم مجدداً. تراودني تساؤلات عديدة بإستمرار: هل هم بخير؟ هل سيكونون بخير؟ كيف هي الحياة هناك؟ يقولون بأن الحياة هناك عبارة عن صراع مستمر ولكن يقولون أيضاً بأنهم أوفر حظاً من غيرهم وأنهم يدبّرون أمورهم. يطلبون مني التركيز على حياتي وتخطّي العقبات التي تضعها هذه البلاد في وجهي

القمع الممنهج يولّد اليأس. هذا ما تفعله عمليّة اللجوء بالناس. تجعل منّي مجرد رقم، إحصاء، وضرر

Commemoration rally for the deceased due to the European border regime on 15 October at Oranienplatz

GEDENKKUNDGEBUNG – COMMEMORATION
Friday, 15 October at 16:00, Oranienplatz, Berlin-Kreuzberg

https://www.facebook.com/events/388215709515081?ref=newsfeed

Am 15.10.2021, 16:00 Uhr, Oranienplatz, wollen wir wie jedes Jahr allen Menschen gedenken, die durch das europäische Grenzregime ihr Leben verloren haben. Kommt zahlreich, bringt gerne Blumen und eure persönlichen Gedenkmomente mit.

On 15/10/2021, 16:00, Oranienplatz, we want to commemorate, as we do every year, all the people who have lost their lives because of the European border regime. Come in large numbers, feel free to bring flowers and your own personal moments of remembrance.

Le 15.10.2021, 16h00, Oranienplatz nous commémorons, comme nous le faisons chaque année, toutes les personnes qui ont perdu la vie à cause du système frontalier de l’union européene. Venez nombreux.ses, n’hésitez pas à apportez des fleurs et vos moments personnels de commémoration.

Freedom to move, freedom to stay! Rally in front of BAMF, 6 September, 13h

The asylum-seeking population is mostly affected by the lack of opportunities, by the limitations of the state and its structures.
Their integrity, their identity, their lives are in mortal danger where they come from and when they arrive here they are met with indifferent and inhumane treatment by the BAMF and the Ausländerbehörde.

These institutions are not really interested in providing a dignified life for migrants, but in their public strategies and image to feed their white supremacist ego. In this way they evade and make invisible their political and economic responsibility, as one of the world’s largest arms exporting powers to the global south, as well as their responsibility as one of the territories with the most access to resource extraction in the world.

For this reason we call this protest in support of the migrant history and resistance in Germany and the refugee movement, which Napuli is currently leading at Oranienplatz, as well as the Colombian asylum seeker in Osnabrück who will chain himself to a court next week, trying to appeal his stay in Germany before the judge.

We will raise our voices together for the entire migrant population in Germany who suffer daily from colonial structures and global inequalities. We demand reparations and political and economic accountability, now!

(Flyer: Camila Lozano @marica.mila666)

Success! YOU STILL CAN’T EVICT A MOVEMENT!!!

After six days of protest the district provided a favorable response and met almost all of our demands.

The document is now under Napuli’s name. Now it’s possible to establish an info-point again which is allowed to be as big as 7 x 11 meters. The document states that “the info-point can be used as a space for the expression of public opinion and the political advancement of the demands of the ‚refugee protest”.

However, we will go into further negotiations with the district, to share the responsibilities of the agreement with at least three to five other people and to have the possibility to erect a tent or other structures to enable our protest, information events or performances.

O-Platz was, is and will continue to be the hub for our political movement and we need everyone to participate in this political process of self-organization!

Thank you for all your support so far but the fight is still on and we unanimously continue to echo that.

We continue to demand:

  1. Abolishment of the Residenzpflicht (which was initially abolished but is slowly being re-introduced and we are aware of this).
  2. Abolish the inhuman Lager System.
  3. Stop all Deportations!
  4. Stop Racial Profiling and Police Violence!
  5. Stop Queer discrimination and Violence!
  6. Abolish Frontex and the European Border Regime!

We continue to write our history at O-Platz!

 

Daily Resistance #9 is out!

Cover page of issue #9 of the Daily Resistance

Dear friends* and comrades*,

half a year after the last issue, we have managed to compile, translate and design a new issue. 10 pages strong, it comes as always in numerous languages (Farsi, Arabic, French, German, English, Turkish, Spanish). This time, many articles explore the repression and difficulties people have to endure in lagers, but also when it comes to repression by the state, the authorities, border police and, not to forget, the media and public discourse. But also, there can be found signs of empowerment, solidarity and common political struggle. Lastly, many calls and campaigns deliver important statements, reports and follow-up stories on previous stories. Support them, spread the word, get involved!

The articles will be subsequently published here as single posts on oplatz.net.

The PDF version can be read and downloaded down below

You can order printed copies from July 26th by writing to: dailyresistance@systemli.org

 

Next Page »