Tag: detention center

Call for Break Deportation – Refugee Camps Visit

Currently, many people come to Germany. We claim to welcome all of them as symbolized by the prevalent “Refugees Welcome”. According to German law, however, not all of those who flee their countries because of persecution, war, destruction or escaping disaster, for better living and for freedom of movement or other reasons are allowed to stay. They are being subjected to deportation intimidation, mental and psychological torture and racial discrimination. The reasons for their flight are not acknowledged and they are criminalized. In recent months, their legal situation has even worsened as a result of the tightened and toughened asylum laws that has rendered international protection in Germany meaningless. The list of the ever expanding so-called ‘safe countries’ of origin has been extended with the result that more groups of asylum seekers are threatened with deportations. Currently, these deportations are being carried out without warning, in the most inhumane way imaginable.

We are political activists who refuse to accept this inhuman practice ofall fight.preview the German state. Our network is called ‘Break Deportation’. We demand the right to stay for all and the immediate stop to all deportations. In order to achieve that, refugees must organize themselves in communities with other refugee groups like The VOICE Refugee Forum Jena and Roma Community Thueringen to inspire a broader community of refugees and strengthen the struggles, to empower and resist together with supporters as we unite against the Deportation System in Germany and Europe.

That’s why we want to get to know you! We plan to visit you during the coming months on a regular basis in your detention centres or prisons. We want to have an exchange with you on the current developments and to keep each other up to date. How is the situation in the detention centres, in the refugee camps and your homes? Have you heard of deportations or are you yourselves threatened with deportation? How can we together achieve that everyone will stay where they want? Get together, exchange views both among yourselves and with us!

Let us break the isolation and stop deportations together – Touch One Touch All!

Campaign for Political Self-Organisation of Refugees in Thueringen – Refugees in Germany are invited to join this Facebook group: Refugee-Migrants Political Community
Let us break the isolation and stop deportations together – Touch One Touch All!

More Information about the Network: http://breakdeportation.blogsport.de

Roma Thueringen, Gotthardtstraße 21, 4. Floor, 99084 Erfurt (Meetings on every Saturday at 7pm)
Email: roma-thueringen@posteo.de Facebook: Roma Thueringen

The VOICE Refugee Forum, Schillergaesschen 5, 07745 Jena (Meetings on every Thursday at 6pm),
Phone: 017624568988, Email.: thevoicerefugeeforum@riseup.net, http://thevoiceforum.org
Refugees in Germany are invited to join this Facebook group: Refugee-Migrants Political Community

BOOK ABOUT DETENTION AND CONTROL

Border Watch

UK BORDER CHECKPOINT Source: flickr.com #dannyman

Border Watch: Cultures of Immigration, Detention and Control (Anthropology, Culture and Society) by Alexandra Hall  (Pluto Press: London and New York, 2012). 

This book takes an inside look into detention centres and describes in detail everyday encounters  between immigrant/detention  officials and immigrants. Please click here for the  review of this critical book.

Hungary: Refugee riot in the closed detention camp Békéscsaba

Most of the asylum seekers in Hungary are kept in closed camps, forced to wait in detention for the result of their asylum claim. There are also so called “open camps”, where asylum seekers are placed[1]. The decision on whether a refugee will be brought to an open or a closed camp, depends on her or his country of origin but also on the gender. Generalizing the cases of persons from same countries, refugees from states that have better chances to get asylum in Hungary (like Eritrea, Afghanistan and other countries) are ‘accommodated’ in open camps for asylum seekers, whereas others, whose asylum chances are considered to be bad due to their state of origin, are kept in detention for a uncertain period of time. The capacities of the immigration jails are: around 200 in Debrecen, around 200 in Békéscsaba, and around 130 people in Nyírbátor. This is a permanent violation of human rights by the Hungarian state and the European Union.